Thursday, June 21, 2018

JavaScript - Method to Call Backend Logic in Sequential Loop

When we call backend REST service from JavaScript - call by default is executed async. This means it will not wait until response from backend is received, but will continue executing code. This is expected and desired functionality in most of the cases. But it might be requirement, where you want to call backend in synchronised way. Example - calling backend service multiple times in the loop, next call must be invoked only after previous call is complete. With default async functionality, loop will complete before first REST call.

Here is the example of calling backend REST service (through Oracle JET API, using JQuery in the background). Call is made 3 times, with success callback printing a message. One more message is printed at the end of each loop iteration:


Three backend REST calls are executed in the loop:


Loop completes earlier than REST call from the first iteration, we can see it from the log:


It might be valid and expected behaviour for most of the cases. But depending on backend logic, may be you would like to guarantee no call from second iteration will be invoked, until first iteration call not complete. This can be achieved by specifying async function and using Promise inside the loop. We should use await new Promise syntax and resolve it in success callback by calling next():


With promise applied, loop is executed sequentially - next loop iteration is started, only after backend service success callback is invoked. You can see it from the log:


Source code is available on my GutHub repository.

Monday, June 18, 2018

Custom JavaScript Client Code in Oracle Visual Builder

Hey, this is my first post about VBCS, you should expect more posts in the future about this topic. Red Samurai decided to choose VBCS as our primary JavaScript development IDE in the cloud. We are going to use it for declarative JS development, similar as we use JDeveloper for ADF.

I was going through the custom JS client code functionality in VBCS and thought it would be good idea to describe how it works. There is good material available for the same topic from Oracle, I recommend to go through it - Variables, Modules, and Functions, OH MY! Custom Client Code in Visual Builder.

I have created simple UI with one input and one output field. Button calls custom JS method, where value from input field will be processed and returned to be displayed in disabled field:


Below I will describe how all parts are wired together. Across different parts of VBCS there is a lot of resemblance with the way how ADF development done - this helps to reuse ADF skills for VBCS.

VBCS allows to define variables on 3 levels:

1. Page - page scope
2. Flow - flow scope
3. Application - application scope

In my example I decided to go with page scope variables (defined in page called main-start) - first one is assigned with input field and second with output:


There is property inspector, it allows to assign expressions to UI fields. Below you can see first variable assigned to input field:


Second variable is assigned to output field:


Button is assigned with action chain call - in VBCS we can call action chains. In ADF we call action listener and code Java logic in the method, here action chain gives more flexibility, you will see this below in action chain implementation:


VBCS allows to switch to code view and check HTML structure built with JET components. This is useful when you want to adjust generated code by yourself or copy layout to external JET project:


There is JS tab, associated with each VBCS page. There we can find JS file, where custom code can be included. I have created basic custom function, just for a test purpose:


VBCS JS code editor offers extensive auto suggest functionality - great help during development:


In case of syntax issues - errors are reported in audit window:


There is separate tab for action chains, I have already one - called from button (see above):


Action chain editor view - along with diagram, we have various components available. This looks slightly similar to SOA/BPM extension in JDeveloper, isn't it? In this action chain, first of all we call custom action - custom JS method define above:


Input parameter for JS call is assigned from page variable (input component):


In the next step - assign variables logic is called, this helps to assign function return value to page variable, which is mapped with output UI field:


Function return value mapping with page variable:


Application can be tested with single click, our message is printed in the log:


I have exported VBCS application and uploaded to GitHub repository. Once you export from VBCS, can access and check generated code. Here is main page code:


In main-start-page.json we can see metadata definition. For example, there we can find button event mapping with action chain:


VBCS looks very promising to me and I think this might be declarative JS development future.

Sunday, June 17, 2018

CDN Support in Oracle JET

With the recent releases of Oracle JET - CDN support in your app can be enabled easily. By default JET app is set to download all JET toolkit related scripts and static files from the same host, where application is hosted. You can track it easily through network monitor, you should see such files as ojknockout.js, etc. fetched from same host:


CDN can be enabled by changing use property from local to cdn in path_mapping.json and restarting the app:


After this change, you should see all JET toolkit content to be downloaded from static.oracle.com host:


Benefit - you reduce load on your host, from where only application specific files will be downloaded, with JET toolkit code downloaded from external Oracle host. Same achievable on your own host, but JET toolkit content downloaded from Oracle host - is compressed out of the box (another benefit):

Monday, June 11, 2018

Machine Learning Applied - TensorFlow Chatbot UI with Oracle JET Custom Component

This post is based on Oracle Code 2018 Shenzhen, Warsaw and Berlin talks. View presentation on SlideShare:


In my previous post I have outlined how to build chatbot backend with TensorFlow - Classification - Machine Learning Chatbot with TensorFlow. Today post is the next step - I will explain how to build custom UI on top of TensorFlow chatbot with Oracle JET.

You can download complete source code (which includes TensorFlow part, backend for chatbot context processing and JET custom component chatbot UI) from my GitHub repository.

Here is solution architecture snapshot:


TensorFlow is used for machine learning and text classification task. Flask allows to communicate through REST to TensorFlow from outside. Contextual chatbot conversation processing is implemented in Node.js backend, communication with Oracle JET client is handled by Socket.io.

Key point in chatbot implementation - correct data structure construction for machine training process. More accurate learning will be, better classification results will be achieved afterwards. Chatbot training data can come in the form of JSON. Training data quality can be measured by overlap between intents and sample sentences. As more overlaps you have, weaker machine learning output will be produced and classification will be less accurate. Training data can contain information which is not used directly by TensorFlow - we can include intent context processing into the same structure, it will be used by context processing algorithm. Sample JSON structure for training data:


Accurate classification by TensorFlow is only one piece of chatbot functionality. We need to maintain conversation context. This can be achieved in Node.js backend, by custom algorithm. In my example, when context is not set - TensorFlow is called to classify statement and produce intent probability. There might be multiple intents classified for the same sentence - TensorFlow will return multiple probabilities. It is up to you, either to always choose intent with top probability or ask user to choose. Communication back to the client is handled through Socket.io by calling socket.emit function:


If context was already set, we don't call classification function - we don't need it in this step. Rather we check by intent context mapping - what should be the next step. Based on that information, we send back question or action to the client, again through Socket.io by calling socket.emit function:


Chatbot UI is implemented with JET custom component (check how it works in JET cookbook). This makes it easy to reuse the same component in various applications:


Here is example, when chatbot UI is included into consuming application. It comes with custom listener, where any custom actions are executed. Custom listener allows to move any custom logic outside of chatbot component, making it truly reusable:


Example for custom logic - based on chatbot reply, we can load application module, assign parameter values, etc.:


Chatbot UI implementation is based on the list, which renders bot and client messages using the template. This template detects if message belongs to client or bot and applies required style - this helps to render readable list. Also there is input area and control buttons:


JS module executes logic which helps to display bot message, by adding it to the list of messages generates event to be handled by custom logic listener. Message is sent from the client to the bot server by calling Socket.io socket.emit function:


Here is the final result - chatbot box implemented with Oracle JET:

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Effective Way to Get Changed Rows in ADF BC API

Did you ever wondered how to get all changed rows in the transaction, without iterating through entire row set? It turns out to be pretty simple with ADF BC API method - getAllEntityInstancesIterator, which is invoked for Entity Definition attached to current VO.

Method works well - it returns changed rows from different row set pages, not only from the current. In my experiment, I changed couple of rows in the first page:


And couple of rows in 5th page. Also I removed row and created one:


Method returns information about all changed rows, as well as deleted and new:


Example of getAllEntityInstancesIterator method usage in VO Impl class. This method helps to get all changed rows in current transaction, very handy:


Sample application source code is available on GitHub.

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Oracle ADF BC REST - Performance Review and Tuning

I thought to check how well ADF BC REST scales and how fast it performs. For that reason, I implemented sample ADF BC REST application and executed JMeter stress load test against it. You can access source code for application and JMeter script on my GitHub repository. Application is called Blog Visitor Counter app for a reason - I'm using same app to count blog visitors. This means each time you are accessing blog page - ADF BC REST service is triggered in the background and it logs counter value with timestamp (no personal data).

Application structure is straightforward - ADF BC REST implementation:


When REST service is accessed (GET request is executed) - it creates and commits new row in the background (this is why I like ADF BC REST - you have a lot of power and flexibility in the backend), before returning total logged rows count:


New row is assigned with counter value from DB sequence, as well as with timestamp. Both values are calculated in Groovy. Another bonus point for ADF BC REST, besides writing logic in Java - you can do scripting in Groovy - this makes code simpler:


Thats it - ADF BC REST service is ready to run. You may wonder, how I'm accessing it from blog page. ADF BC REST services as any other REST, can be invoked through HTTP request. In this particular case, I'm calling GET operation through Ajax call in JavaScript on client side. This script is uploaded to blogger HTML:


Performance

I'm using JMeter to execute performance test. In below example, REST GET request is invoked in infinite loop by 100 concurrent threads. This creates constant load and allows to measure how ADF BC REST application performs under such load:


ADF BC REST scales well, with 100 concurrent threads it does request processing in 0.1 - 0.2 seconds. If we would compare it to ADF UI request processing time, it would be around 10 times faster. This is expected, because JSF and ADF Faces UI classes are not used during ADF BC REST request. Performance test statistics for 100 threads, see Avg logged time in milliseconds:


Tuning

1. Referenced Pool Size and Application Module Pooling

ADF BC REST executes request is stateless mode, REST nature is stateless. I though to check, what this mean for Application Module tuning parameters. I have observed that changing Referenced Pool Size value doesn't influence application performance, it works either with 0 or any other value in the same way. Referenced Pool Size parameter is not important for ADF BC REST runtime:


Application performs well under load, there are no passivations/activations logged, even when Referenced Pool Size is set to zero.


However, I found that it is still important to keep Enable Application Module Pooling = ON. If you switch it OFF - passivation will start to appear, which consumes processing power and is highly unrecommended. So, keep Enable Application Module Pooling = ON.

2. Disconnect Application Module Upon Release

It is important to set Disconnect Application Module Upon Release = ON (read more about it - ADF BC Tuning with Do Connection Pooling and TXN Disconnect Level). This will ensure there will be always near zero DB connections left open:


Otherwise if we keep Disconnect Application Module Upon Release = OFF:


DB connections will not be released promptly:


This summarises important points related to ADF BC REST tuning.