Saturday, June 15, 2019

Running Oracle JET as Progressive Web App

Progressive Web Apps (PWA) topic is a hot thing in web development these days. Read more about it - Progressive Web Apps. The beauty and power behind PWA - user can install a web app to his mobile device, without going through the app store. This simplifies update process too, when a new version of the app is available, the user will get it straight away, because it is essentially a Web page, wrapped to look like an installed app.

Inspired by this post - A Simple Progressive Web App Tutorial, I decided to add PWA config into Oracle JET app and test how it works (on Android, didn't test on iOS, but there is nothing JET specific, if PWA is supported on iOS, it should work).

Oracle JET PWA sample app is deployed on Heroku (PWA will work only if the app is coming through HTTPS) and available under this URL. The sample app is available on GitHub repo. Node.js wrapper for this sample is available in another GitHub repo, you can use it to deploy on Heroku or another service.

Access JET app URL, the app will be loaded and you should see Android notification in the bottom. Google Chrome mobile browser automatically is recognizing PWA app by manifest and offers to "install" it by adding to the home screen:


Select notification and you will get a confirmation message:


Select "Add" and Web app will be added to the home screen. It will look like a real mobile app for the user. For example, the user could get runtime stats for the app, check storage and data usage metrics:


The app is added to the home screen (look for Oracle  JET icon):


Select the app icon and app will be opened. There is no URL address bar in the header and indeed it looks like a mobile app, not a Web page:


The app will be recognized as PWA, if certain config steps were implemented. One of them - you need to add manifest file (add it in Oracle JET in the same folder as index.html) and provide app icons, name, etc.:


The manifest file must be included through a reference in the app entry point - index page (Oracle JET index.html page for example):


In addition to manifest, the app must define a service worker (same as manifest file, you can create this file in the same directory as Oracle JET index.html). PWA doesn't only bring the visual experience of the real app to the Web application. You can define a cache store for the app files, this means next time when offline - app files will load from local cache storage, there will be no need to download them from the internet:


Service worker can be registered from main.js file where Oracle JET context is initialized on the application initial load. Add service worker registration at the bottom of main.js:


The idea of this post was to share a simple example of PWA for Oracle JET. This should help you to get started quickly with PWA support config for Oracle JET app.

Friday, June 7, 2019

Running Oracle JET on Heroku with Node.js (JET Showcase)

I have implemented JET (more about Oracle JET) showcase app with data visualization components usage. This app shows historical weather data in Boston city, the dataset is taken from Kaggle. Switching years makes data visualization to change and show new data - I love how polar chat is updated. Calendar displays temperature for each day during the year using JET picto chart component:


App is deployed on Heroku and available by this URL. Heroku provides $7 per month account with analytics and better resources, but there is a free option too (it comes with sleep after 30 minutes of inactivity) - free option is good for experimentation, as for this case.

Heroku dashboard for the deployed JET app:


Free deployment comes without analytics option:


App comes with two options - Dashboard and Histogram. The dashboard allows switching between years and shows a polar chart along with daily temperature calendar:


The histogram displays the same data in a different view:


This app comes with Web Component implementation, yes Web Components are a standard feature in JET. Toolbar, where you can switch years, is implemented as Web Component:


Web Component is being used in both UIs - dashboard and histogram:


Visualization components are getting data through Knockout.JS observable variables:


Variables are initialized in JS functions:


Resources:

1. Heroku deployment guide for Node.js
2. Node.js app which is deployed on Heroku - GitHub. JET content is inside the public folder. JET content is copied from JET app web folder, after running ojet build --release
3. Oracle JET app - GitHub

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

ADF Faces and Client Side Value with innerHTML

In ADF Faces you can leverage the full power of JavaScript. I will explain how you could assign a value from ADF Faces component to the plain HTML div.

The sample app is available on GitHub repo. It doesn't require DB connection, you can run it straight away in Oracle JDeveloper.

Look into JSF page. I have implemented ADF Faces input component with value change listener. Below this component, there is HTML div with ID ot1. We will assign a text value to this div programmatically from JS function passClientSideValue:


JavaScript function reads the value by client ID from ADF Faces component and assigns it to the innerHTML property of HTML div:


When ADF Faces value is changed, value change listener is invoked through ADF auto-submit event. In value change listener, we extract client ID of the input component and pass it to JS function through JavaScript call from Java:


This is how the end result looks like:


In particular, this approach can be useful, when you want to bypass ADF Faces validation lifecycle and display updated value despite current validation errors in the form.